Man at His Best

Step Inside Salvador Dalí's Painting As Though You've Attached A GoPro On Your Forehead

Watch this in fullscreen, 2160s 4K, surround sound while you twiddle that moustache you do not have.

BY ZUL ANDRA | Feb 7, 2016 | Arts

To understand the significance of "Dreams of Dalí: 360º Video", we must first grasp the full weight of its impact. And what better way to explain it than with this homage by commenter, IEANO.

"MAYBE NOT EVEN THE CREATORS OF THIS ART ARE FULLY AWARE OF WHAT THEY CREATED.... THIS IS THAT KIND OF WORK WHICH YOU WILL THINK BACK ABOUT IN THE LAST HOURS OF YOUR LIFE.... AND AFTER YOUR HEART STOPS... AND YOUR BODY SHUTS DOWN... YOU RESURRECT IN YOUR OWN MASTERPIECE.. AND LIVE ON FOREVER... YOU BECOME IMMORTAL...... [Sic everywhere]."

Immortal, guys. You watch this video and you might just achieve Nirvana or something of its equivalent. If the Spanish surrealist painter was around to read the comment, he might agree.

The video could arguably describe how Dalí imagined his work, Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s “Angelus”, when he was making up stories from a painting by Jean-François Millet, called the Angelus, which was hanging on the wall in his elementary school.

It's important to note that as a young boy with barely any facial hair, Dalí thought that Millet's work—which depicts a peasant couple standing in a field with their heads bowed in prayer—was troubling. Dalí then produced a series of paintings and writings based off it.

In Dalí's rendition, the female towers over the man—who is depicted as vulnerable. Poor guy. Against popular belief, he also insisted that Millet's original was the scene of a funeral and not a prayer ritual. He believed that there was a sense of anguish hidden in plain sight. 

That, reportedly, turned out to be true when The Louvre Museum x-rayed Millet's The Angelus, revealing a geometrical shape between the two figures—arguably, the coffin of their dead child.

Why don't you check it out for yourself? It's real fun!